Changes in the 20th century

Like previous centuries the 20th century was one of change, but this time, by standing on the shoulders of giants the change was to be extraordinary. Social Change The statistics tell some of the story: Some statistics for the 20th century   1900 2000 Population [1] 38.3 million 59.0 million Gross Domestic Product [2] £146.8 million Read More …

Index of suggested searches

Here is and index of many of the events, people and places mentioned that you can use to copy and paste into the search bar – just click on the magnifying glass symbol to the right of the menu to bring the search bar up. I have completed a few searches and linked them and Read More …

Changes in the 18th century

The changing world The period that had seen the start of building and the population of Combe Down in the 1730s was little different from previous centuries. The economy was based on agriculture for the vast majority and the way the world worked was still quite feudal. By feudal I mean that the large landowners and Read More …

On Combe Down 1900 – 1950

Bath Tramways Bath had horse drawn trams from 1880. The reduced friction of rail tracks meant that horse drawn trams could carry more people on the flat in more comfort compared to horse drawn omnibuses. Slopes were a different matter. Another problem was that many horses were needed as regular changes had to be made. Read More …

John Thomas – the forgotten man of Prior Park

One of the owners of Prior Park has been almost forgotten. Ralph Allen, Gertrude Tucker, Viscount Hawarden and Bishop Baines are all reasonably well known, but John Thomas (1752 – 1827) is not. Yet he was a Quaker who owned Prior Park for over 15 years between 1809 and 1827 and certainly deserves to be Read More …

Changes in the 19th century

By 1800 the Scientific, Agricultural, Industrial, Communications, Transport and Financial Revolutions, referred to earlier, had set the scene for real change but, it had not yet happened to any great degree. More people were living an urban existence, but most peoples’ day to day lives were still substantially similar to those of their forbears – mechanisation had Read More …

More pages and infills about Combe Down

I have added more pages and infills about Combe Down by filling in some obvious gaps. There’s some old adverts mentioning Combe Down or Monkton Combe – none very exciting it has to be said, but hopefully further research will find some that are. Having said that, even if the adverts themselves don’t excite they can Read More …

Census summaries for Monkton Combe, Combe Down & Greendown

Censuses Dates of U.K. censuses Year Day and date 1841 Sunday, 6 June 1851 Sunday, 30 March 1861 Sunday, 7 April 1871 Sunday, 2 April 1881 Sunday, 3 April 1891 Sunday, 5 April 1901 Sunday, 31 March 1911 Sunday, 2 April Census Summary 1841 – 1901 ALL 1841 1851 1861 1871 1881 1891 1901 Properties Read More …

Isabella Place from 1900

1901 – The Hadley Estate The Hadley Estate on Combe Down had come about when Edward Layton (abt 1730 – 1805) had bought some of the land being auctioned by Thomas Ralph Maude 2nd Viscount Hawarden (1767 – 1807), Mary Allen’s son and Ralph Allen’s great nephew after the death of his father Cornwallis Maude 1st Viscount Hawarden in 1803. Edward Read More …

De Montalt Place from 1900

1901 – Rev Reginald Guy Bryan The Rev Reginald Guy Bryan (1819 – 1912) was living at 6 De Montalt Place in 1901, together with his third wife Caroline Letitia Gore (1843 – 1920) whome he married in 1896. She was the daughter of Mary Eliza Gore (née Hole) (1813 – 1891) who had lived there previously. Read More …

Occupants of 109, 113, 115 & 117 Church Road, Combe Down from 1805 to 1850

Margaretta – 115 & 117 Margaretta – (Bull, Taylor) (1784 – 1869) lived at what is now 115 Church Road for at least 35 years from at least 1827 until 1862. She has been the most frustrating of all the occupants to unravel of all. It’s still not complete, as her first husband remains a mystery, thus her Read More …

On Combe Down 1805 – 1850

Combe Down was still a small outpost of Bath. At the beginning of the century there were probably less that 200 – 300 people resident on Combe Down and in Monkton Combe[1]. Clearly houses were being built but other information is quite scarce. But, by 1841 Combe Down had grown considerably and had two churches and a school. Read More …

Bibliography for Prior to Now

Enumerative bibliography 1822 Pigot’s Directory, Somerset and Bristol 1875 Institution of Civil Engineers: Obituaries 2011 Census Ethnic Group, local authorities in the United Kingdom A Biographical Dictionary of Civil Engineers in Great Britain and Ireland edited by A. W. Skempton (2002) A biographical peerage of Ireland, in which are memoirs and characters of the most Read More …

Combe Down Quarries

Combe Down’s freestone is why it exists. Freestone is a fine grained stone which can be cut easily in any direction without shattering or splitting. Combe Down quarries’ stone is oolitic limestone and the beds are part of the Great Oolite, of middle Jurassic age, laid down in a shallow sea about 146 million years Read More …

Belmont villas

It is clear from Cotterel’s map of 1852 that no housing existed on Belmont at the time, though the line of what would become the road is clear. It is also clear that all the Belmont villas were built by 1904. In an article about Freshford & Limpley Stoke Cottagers’ Friend Society in the Bath Read More …

Summaries of the early Deeds for 115 and 117 Church Road, Combe Down

  Dated 8th day of August 1862 Mr. Edward Palethorp to Mr. John Taylor | Demise of a small Strip of Ground and Release of use of a Well on Coombe Down near Bath Signed Sealed and Delivered by the within named Edward Palethorp in the presence of Thos. Murray Sol. Bath Signed Sealed and Delivered Read More …

On Combe Down 1850 – 1900

In ‘Rambles about Bath’, Tunstall says about Monkton Combe: “In 1780, it paid £103 poor rates, its population being 280; in 1841, from the great increase of the village of Combe Down, its population was 1,107. This is steadily increasing.” In 1831 Samuel Lewis put the population of “Combe (Moncton)” at 855.[1] Looking at the Read More …