Occupants of 109, 113, 115 & 117 Church Road, Combe Down from 1805 to 1850

Margaretta – 115 & 117 Margaretta – (Bull, Taylor) (1784 – 1869) lived at what is now 115 Church Road for at least 35 years from at least 1827 until 1862. She has been the most frustrating of all the occupants to unravel of all. It’s still not complete, as her first husband remains a mystery, thus her Read More …

Bibliography for Prior to Now

Enumerative bibliography 1822 Pigot’s Directory, Somerset and Bristol 1875 Institution of Civil Engineers: Obituaries 2011 Census Ethnic Group, local authorities in the United Kingdom A Biographical Dictionary of Civil Engineers in Great Britain and Ireland edited by A. W. Skempton (2002) A biographical peerage of Ireland, in which are memoirs and characters of the most Read More …

Index of suggested searches

Here is and index of many of the events, people and places mentioned that you can use to copy and paste into the search bar – just click on the magnifying glass symbol to the right of the menu to bring the search bar up. I have completed a few searches and linked them and Read More …

Bath 1700 – 1764

In looking at the history of Combe Down one, inevitably, has to look at the history of Bath 1700 – 1764. Bath today is very well known, a UNESCO World Heritage site known for its natural hot springs and 18th century Georgian architecture. Your browser does not support iframes. TripAdvisor describes it thus: “Known for Read More …

Bathampton manor

When I was writing the book there were items that I collected that I didn’t use. So, I’ve started to go back through the rather poorly indexed images and see what I could add via this blog. The first images I found were not about Combe Down at all, but about Bathampton Manor and they’re rather Read More …

Wikipedia area entries around Combe Down

Prior to Now on Combe Down link: Combe Down development timeline Prior to Now on Combe Down link: Combe Down Quarries Prior to Now on Combe Down link: Combe Down Tunnel Prior to Now on Combe Down link: Ralph Allen and Prior Park Prior to Now on Combe Down link: Ralph Allen and Prior Park Read More …

On Combe Down 1805 – 1850

Combe Down was still a small outpost of Bath. At the beginning of the century there were probably less that 200 – 300 people resident on Combe Down and in Monkton Combe[1]. Clearly houses were being built but other information is quite scarce. But, by 1841 Combe Down had grown considerably and had two churches and a school. Read More …

Local and family history links

Here are some links to local sites that cover some of the local history of other Bath villages and family history in Somerset, Dorset and Wiltshire. If you know of any other local or family history orientated sites for Bath and its villages, or nearby towns and villages, that should be added to this list, Read More …

Combe Down before Ralph Allen

We know there was Roman occupation on Combe Down, as a Roman Villa was found below Belmont Road in 1852. On a stone coffin lid that was found there was the inscription: “PRO SALVTE IMP CES M AVR ANTONINI PII FELICIS INVICTI AVG NAEVIVS AVG LIB ADIVT PROC PRINCIPIA RVINA OPRESS A SOLO RESTITVIT”. This has been Read More …

Combe Down development timeline

This page is here to help to make it a bit easier to understand where to goon the site to find something and to find out more about the Combe Down development timeline. There’s quite a lot on site and even with sub menus it’s, sometimes, not easy to decide! If you’re interested in seeing the timeline Read More …

Istography

A Brief History Of The Stone Quarries At Combe Down | http://people.bath.ac.uk/exxbgs/journal_articles/CombeDown.pdf A Chronological History of Bath Stone Quarrying | http://www.cerberusspeleo.org.uk/Journals/jnl24301.htm A Concise History Of Bathstone Quarrying | http://www.choghole.co.uk/ A vision of Britain | http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/ Admiralty 4, Prior Park Auxiliary Unit Patrol | http://www.coleshillhouse.com/admiralty-4-bath-auxiliary-unit-patrol.php Ancestry | http://www.ancestry.co.uk Archaeology Data Service | http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/ BANES | http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/  Read More …

The Parsonage later The Vicarage later The Old Vicarage

Holy Trinity church was consecrated on 29th June 1835 but there was nowhere for the vicar to live. An appeal to build a Parsonage was launched in 1836 in The Bath Chronicle but there was enough confidence that funds would be raised to proceed with tasking Henry Edmund Goodridge (1797 – 1864) to draw up plans Read More …

Claremont Buildings later Hopecote

For much of the information about the owners of Claremont Buildings later Hopecote I am indebted to Jean Nisbett and her book Hopecote, A History Of A Building. Prior to Hopecote there were three houses: 1 – 3 Claremont Buildings. Like Isabella Place, Claremont House and 113 – 117 Church Road they were built about 1805. Read More …

Benjamin Wingrove

We have seen that up to 1800 Combe Down had remained much as it had in Ralph Allen’s day and before. The Maude family sell off occasioned by the substantial debts incurred by Cornwallis Maude, 1st Viscount Hawarden (1729 – 1803) had led to the development of Isabella Place and created the Hadley Estate. But others had been buying Read More …

Ralph Allen and Prior Park

It is impossible to look at the development of Combe Down without reference to Ralph Allen (1693 – 1764) and to Prior Park – ‘the architectural jewel of Combe Down’. Prior Park and Ralph Allen’s stories are generally well known and there are a number of books[1] that give quite detailed accounts. However, it is worth covering the basics. Read More …

Combe Down Quarries

Combe Down’s freestone is why it exists. Freestone is a fine grained stone which can be cut easily in any direction without shattering or splitting. Combe Down quarries’ stone is oolitic limestone and the beds are part of the Great Oolite, of middle Jurassic age, laid down in a shallow sea about 146 million years Read More …

On Combe Down 1900 – 1950

Bath Tramways Bath had horse drawn trams from 1880. The reduced friction of rail tracks meant that horse drawn trams could carry more people on the flat in more comfort compared to horse drawn omnibuses. Slopes were a different matter. Another problem was that many horses were needed as regular changes had to be made. Read More …

On Combe Down 1850 – 1900

In ‘Rambles about Bath’, Tunstall says about Monkton Combe: “In 1780, it paid £103 poor rates, its population being 280; in 1841, from the great increase of the village of Combe Down, its population was 1,107. This is steadily increasing.” In 1831 Samuel Lewis put the population of “Combe (Moncton)” at 855.[1] Looking at the Read More …

Isabella Place 1800 – 1900

Isabella Place, like Claremont House, 113 – 117 Church Road and Hopecote (originally 1 – 3 Claremont Buildings) was built about 1805. Claremont House, 113 – 117 Church Road and 1 – 3 Claremont Buildings were all, originally 2 storeys and ‘2up 2down’. You can find out more about the Building of Isabella Place. 1805 – Mrs Bonner’s initiatory academy Read More …

Owners and Occupants of 109, 113, 115 & 117 Church Road, Combe Down from 1850 to 1900

Included among the owners and occupants of 109, 113, 115 & 117 Church Road from 1850 to 1900 are the following. Nathan Atherton – 109 and 113 We have already touched on Atherton and Gabriel of Calne, the solicitors, when looking at John Gabriel. A deed, about the sale of the freehold ground rents in 1919, mentions Read More …